Crystals Maze smpl811pp

Crystal Maze

Maze of Crystals by Yanito Freminoshif | SOLVED

When we look at the random order of the universe, it may seem unrealistic to expect a bias towards seeing order. Cognitive behaviorist Tommy Blanchard, a doctoral candidate at the University of Rochester, argues that from an evolutionary perspective, order, as opposed to random events, accounts for many of the behaviors that we see in humans today. Blanchard created a research project based on the proposition that humans are  magazine spoof cover - monkey travel magazinehard-wired to search for order. Order helped early man acquire needed natural resources, including food and tools. Since natural resources rarely distribute themselves randomly in their natural environment, primates, and then humans, adapted by learning to expect this type of distribution. Blanchard theorizes that this type of adaptive behavior evolved. For early man, knowing where food had been found in the past made it possible to find food in the future. Humans, he says, have an inborn tendency towards searching out randomness which is a trait that helps us adapt and goes a long way towards ensuring the survival of the species. To test his hypothesis Blanchard designed a study that connects evolutionary science to gambling behavior as evidenced among online casino players and live casino gamers. Blanchard began his research project by considering ways to assess the cognitive abilities of early humans by examining non-human primates. He based his reasoning on the premise that, if monkeys and humans show similar biases – and if those biases occur in the same situations, develop in the same manner and break down in the similarly, it’s possible to infer that they are the same, since such hereditary traits were part of each of our biological lineages. Blanchard studied male rhesus monkeys who were taught to play a computer game. The monkeys learned that when they gazed at a light they could earn a reward. In two of the play paradigms, the reward was clear with no random choices involved. However, when the monkeys were introduced to a game in which the outcome was random, they immediately demonstrated their preference for the risky type of game. Blanchard and his co-researchers revised the model several times, offering different types of choices and reducing the rewards, but over the course of hundreds of trials, the monkeys never wavered in their preference for a game in which the reward was random. In addition to the correlation to evolution, this study is of great use to casino operators and gamblers who can use the results to create more exciting games.